Seeing Helps Believing

How Many Do You Recognize?

I’m so happy to say “I can see clearly now!”

After my damaged eyes and sight impairment scare last week, I was reminded how precious my eyes are to me. It’s said you don’t appreciate something until you no longer have it. Sad but true. I especially missed all the things I couldn’t do when my eyes needed to take time off in order to heal. I missed reading, writing, watching TV though I say I hate most of the programming, and not being able to look outside (sensitivity to light was another irritating symptom in addition to the pain) to see my beautiful mountains, flowers, gardens, and even the little critters that enjoy eating my organic veggies before I get a chance to harvest them.

I was amazed that I actually missed all my social media too. I often call it UNsocial media because it connects me to family, friends, my work, the entire world, but at a distance. Be social, but don’t get TOO close. So I truly enjoyed it when I could finally get back on-line and plow through my backlogged Facebook, Twitter, web posts, comments, and e-mails. I was astounded to see what’s missed when you can’t or don’t take the opportunity to check out what continues to happen in the world whether or not you’ve been participating. Lots caught my eye and that was a good thing. I got up-to-date on friends’ vacation photos, silly U-Tube videos, even vivid colored ads I had no interest in but was delighted to see just the same.

Then I came across this black and white image, with words so small I had to enlarge my screen to read them. That was when I began to see what is really important. It’s people, people who see what they personally can contribute to the world, and then they do it regardless of how they are seen by others. I looked at these faces for a long time. Each one unique. Each one different. Each one making a difference. So much has been written about how the world has changed and can be changed by the thoughts and actions of just one person. A person authentic enough and courageous enough to say, “This is who I am, this is what I think, this is my gift to you.” I can’t write anything better than that except to say “Thank you for letting me see my belief that I can make a difference in the world with my life is true.” And it’s true for everyone else on the planet, including you!

How many of these people can you identify? How many do you identify with?

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Euphorbia myrsinites – Latin for Danger

Euphorbia myrsinites Handle with EXTREME care.

Euphorbia myrsinites
Handle with EXTREME care.

This is not how I planned to continue my “Starting with the Beginning” posts, but life hands out lots of surprises and this one changed things. So… starting this week, two of my prime pleasures collided and the result is I hope a temporary canceling of both.

You may recognize this image as a plant and the caption as a botanical name. I can assure you of this since I’m a Certified Master Gardener. Appropriately, one of the two pleasures I mentioned is gardening. The second is writing and the reading that’s associated with it. But back to Euphorbia mersinites or its common name, Donkey-Tail Spurge.

If you’re not familiar with it, you’ll benefit by paying attention here. “Spurge” is a type of succulent that contains a thick sap, like Aloe Vera, except its sap is white, very sticky, and not water soluble. Another difference is this succulent is very toxic, not to be confused with merely irritating! Aside from that drawback, it’s a terrific plant. It loves the sun, requires little water, and reseeded itself through lovely pink blossoms at the end of its fat green stems. Oh, another drawback is with too much water it’s so prolific it’s classified as invasive in several states, though not in Nevada where I live.

As a Master Gardener I know all this, and still the Euphorbia that spreads through a rock garden on my dry Reno property and appears at the base of my concrete foundation where nothing else can grow, delights me. When I cut it back, which isn’t often, I cover myself from head to toe and wear heavy gloves. I’ve heard its white goo is so caustic that some people have used it to eradicate brown age spots. I’ve heard gardeners warn never to touch the face or eyes when working with it. They did not mention “safety glasses”. I now emphasize the necessity of using safety glasses when handling toxic plants. They’re important when operating power garden equipment too.

The climax to all this horticultural information is that while awaiting inspiration for my second blog post, I decided to do some Euphorbia trimming. I didn’t feel the tiny splash that must have hit my eye, but I did feel instant excruciating pain accompanied with copious tears, neither stopping until my eye doctor applied numbing anesthetic drops to my eyes six hours later. The relief wasn’t permanent, but the damage isn’t supposed to be either. With the treatment I’m getting, my clear, pain-free vision should return within 5-7 days.

There’ll be no gardening in the bright sunlight until then for me and not any writing or reading either. Fortunately, I received the inspiration I was seeking for this post and I’m grateful for my voice recognition iPad. I’ve located my dust covered safety glasses. I’ve learned to take warnings seriously, especially when they contain Latin names. Please protect yourself and learn from my experience. SEE you in a week!

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Starting with the beginning

In the beginning, the first thing we do is breathe. At the end, the last thing we do is breathe. In between, lots of other things happen. I always thought I was responsible for those things. I experienced a lot of changes and most of them I didn’t like. I didn’t understand them except for the fact that if they were unpleasant it was my fault because I’d done something wrong. If they were good, well I don’t remember a lot of good changes, but if I think about it I know I didn’t take credit for those. So I had a lot of changes. I didn’t have a lot of courage and I didn’t recognize what I had. I mostly held my breath and hoped if I didn’t attract attention, I won’t make a mistake and wind up creating another scary change.

But not breathing took the life out of me. Recently I learned that breathing helps relax the body, stills the mind, centers the soul. Now when I remember that, especially when I’m angry or frightened because I’m facing another change, I stop and consciously breathe. Once is good, three deep breaths is better. Ten focused breaths always reveal my core courage. I limited my breath for most of my life. I’m more aware of it these days. I want to appreciate each breath until I breathe my last. That breath I intend to appreciate most of all.

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Writing Retreat

I’m off for a 10 day creative adventure, starting in Reno, then to a writers’ retreat in northern Montana, to Glacier National Park, and finally to friends in Jackson Hole, WY, before heading home. A peony BLOSSOMed in my yard to say said “good bye”. She’ll be gone before I return.Yard_peony

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS